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Care Management Processes Used Less Often For Depression Than For Other Chronic Conditions In US Primary Care Practices.

TitleCare Management Processes Used Less Often For Depression Than For Other Chronic Conditions In US Primary Care Practices.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsBishop TF, Ramsay PP, Casalino LP, Bao Y, Pincus HA, Shortell SM
JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
Volume35
Issue3
Pagination394-400
Date Published2016 Mar
ISSN1544-5208
KeywordsAsthma, Chronic Disease, Cross-Sectional Studies, Databases, Factual, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Heart Failure, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Patient Care Management, Physicians, Primary Care, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Primary Health Care, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Abstract

Primary care physicians play an important role in the diagnosis and management of depression. Yet little is known about their use of care management processes for depression. Using national survey data for the period 2006-13, we assessed the use of five care management processes for depression and other chronic illnesses among primary care practices in the United States. We found significantly less use for depression than for asthma, congestive heart failure, or diabetes in 2012-13. On average, practices used fewer than one care management process for depression, and this level of use has not changed since 2006-07, regardless of practice size. In contrast, use of diabetes care management processes has increased significantly among larger practices. These findings may indicate that US primary care practices are not well equipped to manage depression as a chronic illness, despite the high proportion of depression care they provide. Policies that incentivize depression care management, including additional quality metrics, should be considered.

DOI10.1377/hlthaff.2015.1068
Alternate JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
PubMed ID26953291
Grant ListK23 AG043499 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
1R01MH104200 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K01MH090087 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K23AG043499 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
Category: 
Faculty Publication