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Characteristics Associated with Patient-Centered Medical Home Capability in Health Centers: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

TitleCharacteristics Associated with Patient-Centered Medical Home Capability in Health Centers: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsGao Y, Nocon RS, Gunter KE, Sharma R, Ngo-Metzger Q, Casalino LP, Chin MH
JournalJ Gen Intern Med
Volume31
Issue9
Pagination1041-51
Date Published2016 Sep
ISSN1525-1497
KeywordsAdult, Community Health Centers, Cross-Sectional Studies, Databases, Factual, Female, Humans, Male, Patient-Centered Care, Quality of Health Care
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is being implemented in health centers (HCs) that provide comprehensive primary care to vulnerable populations.

OBJECTIVE: To identify characteristics associated with HCs' PCMH capability.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of a national dataset of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in 2009. Data for PCMH capability, HC, patient, neighborhood, and regional characteristics were combined from multiple sources.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 706 (70 %) of 1014 FQHCs from the Health Resources and Services Administration Community Health Center Program, representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

MAIN MEASURES: PCMH capability was scored via the Commonwealth Fund National Survey of FQHCs through the Safety Net Medical Home Scale (0 [worst] to 100 [best]). HC, patient, neighborhood, and regional characteristics (all analyzed at the HC level) were measured from the Commonwealth survey, Uniform Data System, American Community Survey, American Medical Association physician data, and National Academy for State Health Policy data.

KEY RESULTS: Independent correlates of high PCMH capability included having an electronic health record (EHR) (11.7-point [95 % confidence interval, CI 10.2-13.3]), more types of financial performance incentives (0.7-point [95 % CI 0.2-1.1] higher total score per one additional type, maximum possible = 10), more types of hospital-HC affiliations (1.6-point [95 % CI 1.1-2.1] higher total score per one additional type, maximum possible = 6), and location in certain US census divisions. Among HCs with an EHR, location in a state with state-supported PCMH initiatives and PCMH payments was associated with high PCMH capability (2.8-point, 95 % CI 0.2-5.5). Other characteristics had small effect size based on the measure unit (e.g. 0.04-point [95 % CI 0-0.08] lower total score per one percentage point more minority patients), but the effects could be practically large at the extremes.

CONCLUSIONS: EHR adoption likely played a role in HCs' improvement in PCMH capability. Factors that appear to hold promise for supporting PCMH capability include a greater number of types of financial performance incentives, more types of hospital-HC affiliations, and state-level support and payment for PCMH activities.

DOI10.1007/s11606-016-3729-8
Alternate JournalJ Gen Intern Med
PubMed ID27216480
PubMed Central IDPMC4978681
Grant ListK24 DK071933 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK092949 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32 HS000084 / HS / AHRQ HHS / United States
Category: 
Faculty Publication