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Feasibility of Automatic Extraction of Electronic Health Data to Evaluate a Status Epilepticus Clinical Protocol.

TitleFeasibility of Automatic Extraction of Electronic Health Data to Evaluate a Status Epilepticus Clinical Protocol.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsHafeez B, Paolicchi J, Pon S, Howell JD, Grinspan ZM
JournalJ Child Neurol
Volume31
Issue6
Pagination709-16
Date Published2016 May
ISSN1708-8283
KeywordsAutomatic Data Processing, Child, Child, Preschool, Clinical Protocols, Cognition Disorders, Electroencephalography, Electronic Health Records, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infant, Male, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Reproducibility of Results, Retrospective Studies, Status Epilepticus, Time Factors
Abstract

Status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in children. Pediatric medical centers often develop protocols to standardize care. Widespread adoption of electronic health records by hospitals affords the opportunity for clinicians to rapidly, and electronically evaluate protocol adherence. We reviewed the clinical data of a small sample of 7 children with status epilepticus, in order to (1) qualitatively determine the feasibility of automated data extraction and (2) demonstrate a timeline-style visualization of each patient's first 24 hours of care. Qualitatively, our observations indicate that most clinical data are well labeled in structured fields within the electronic health record, though some important information, particularly electroencephalography (EEG) data, may require manual abstraction. We conclude that a visualization that clarifies a patient's clinical course can be automatically created using the patient's electronic clinical data, supplemented with some manually abstracted data. Future work could use this timeline to evaluate adherence to status epilepticus clinical protocols.

DOI10.1177/0883073815613564
Alternate JournalJ. Child Neurol.
PubMed ID26518205
Category: 
Faculty Publication Student Publication