For COVID-19 vaccine updates, please review our information guide. For patient eligibility and scheduling availability, please visit VaccineTogetherNY.org.

New Faculty Q & A With Dr. Shoshana Rosenberg

Dr. Shoshana Rosenberg is an assistant professor of population health sciences in the Division of Epidemiology. She received her MPH from New York University and her ScD in epidemiology from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Before joining Weill Cornell Medicine, Dr. Rosenberg had an NCI post-doctoral fellowship in cancer prevention and was an assistant professor of medical oncology/population sciences at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.

What got you involved in epidemiology?

Dr. Shoshana Rosenberg

Dr. Shoshana Rosenberg

I became interested in public health while in college. When I helped manage a clinico-pathologic colorectal cancer database as a research assistant at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center after college, I became intrigued by the power of data and exploring relationships between clinical and genetic factors and outcomes. I realized I loved working in a research environment, but I wanted to be in a position to ask my own research questions and design the studies to answer them. This led to my decision to pursue a doctoral degree in epidemiology.

Tell us about your research

My research has largely focused on issues that impact young women with breast cancer, including survivorship, quality of life, and treatment decision-making in this population. Another area of interest is integrating patient-reported outcome measures into observational studies, as well as therapeutic breast cancer clinical trials.

What expertise do you bring to this new role?

My past and current educational and research experiences have incorporated a broad range of disciplines, including epidemiology, psychology, outcomes, decision science, and health services research. I have training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and more recently been involved in studies that have developed and tested eHealth interventions for young breast cancer patients. I hope to continue this work as well as expand it to include young adult patients diagnosed with other types of cancer.

What brings you to Weill Cornell Medicine?

I am excited for the chance to help build the Division of Epidemiology. I am also very much looking forward to the many opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration across Weill Cornell Medicine and the NewYork-Presbyterian network, the Department of Population Health Sciences, and the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center.

Population Health Sciences 402 E. 67th St. New York, NY 10065 Phone: (646) 962-8078