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Addressing the problem of inaccuracy of measured 24-hour urine collections due to incomplete collection.

TitleAddressing the problem of inaccuracy of measured 24-hour urine collections due to incomplete collection.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsMann SJ, Gerber LM
JournalJ Clin Hypertens (Greenwich)
Date Published2019 Oct 21
ISSN1751-7176
Abstract

The 24-hour urine collection is widely considered the gold standard for assessing 24-hour excretion of various analytes. Yet, studies show that >30% of collections are incomplete and hence understate the true 24-hour excretion. We previously validated an equation for estimating an individual's 24-hour creatinine excretion, based on weight, sex, race, and age. The present study examines whether routinely correcting measured 24-hour excretion of an analyte using the ratio of estimated to measured 24-hour urine creatinine mitigates the misleadingly low values that result from undercollection. Ninety-nine participants, recruited from an outpatient hypertension clinic, submitted a 24-hour urine collection for measurement of creatinine and sodium excretion. The urine collections were dichotomized into complete (n = 63) and incomplete (n = 36) collections based on previously described criteria for expected 24-hour creatinine excretion. To adjust for possible incompleteness of collections, the measured 24-hour values were then corrected by multiplying them by the ratio of estimated to measured 24-hour urine creatinine. The mean 24-hour creatinine excretion was 1682 mg/d among complete collectors. Among incomplete collectors, the mean was 1211 mg/d before and 1695 mg/d after, adjustment. Similarly, mean 24-hour sodium excretion was 156 mEq/d among complete collectors, whereas among incomplete collectors it was 121 mEq/d before and 171 mEq/d after, adjustment. Undercollection of 24-hour urines is a common problem and results in misleadingly low values for excretion of analytes being measured. Routine adjustment of 24-hour urine values using estimated values for 24-hour creatinine excretion can greatly mitigate artifactually low 24-hour excretion results.

DOI10.1111/jch.13696
Alternate JournalJ Clin Hypertens (Greenwich)
PubMed ID31631523
Grant List / / Julia and Seymour Gross Foundation and by Allied Minds, Inc /
Division: 
Biostatistics
Category: 
Faculty Publication