For information about COVID-19, including symptoms and prevention, please read our COVID-19 patient guide. Please also consider supporting Weill Cornell Medicine’s efforts against the pandemic.

Changes in Outpatient Imaging Utilization and Spending Under a New Population-Based Primary Care Payment Model.

TitleChanges in Outpatient Imaging Utilization and Spending Under a New Population-Based Primary Care Payment Model.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsDinh CT, Linn KA, Isidro U, Emanuel EJ, Volpp KG, Bond AM, Caldarella K, Troxel AB, Zhu J, Yang L, Matloubieh SE, Drye E, Bernheim S, Lee EOshima, Mugiishi M, Endo KTakata, Yoshimoto J, Yuen I, Okamura S, Tom J, Navathe AS
JournalJ Am Coll Radiol
Volume17
Issue1 Pt B
Pagination101-109
Date Published2020 Jan
ISSN1558-349X
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the implementation of a new population-based primary care payment system, Population-Based Payments for Primary Care (3PC), initiated by Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA; the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Hawaii), was associated with changes in spending and utilization for outpatient imaging in its first year.

METHODS: In this observational study, we used claims data from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2016. We used a propensity-weighted difference-in-differences design to compare 70,284 HMSA patients in Hawaii attributed to 107 primary care physicians (PCPs) and 4 physician organizations participating in 3PC in its first year of implementation (2016) and 195,902 patients attributed to 312 PCPs and 14 physician organizations that used a fee-for-service model during the study period. The primary outcome was total spending on outpatient imaging tests, and secondary outcomes included spending and utilization by modality.

RESULTS: The study included 266,186 HMSA patients (mean age of 43.3 years; 51.7% women) and 419 PCPs (mean age of 54.9 years; 34.8% women). The 3PC system was not significantly associated with changes in total spending for outpatient imaging. Of 12 secondary outcomes, only 3 were statistically significant, including changes in nuclear medicine spending (adjusted differential change = -20.1% [95% confidence interval = -27.5% to -12.1%]; P < .001) and utilization (adjusted differential change = -18.1% [95% confidence interval = -23.8 to -11.9%]; P < .001).

DISCUSSION: The HMSA 3PC system was not associated with significant changes in total spending for outpatient imaging, though spending and utilization on nuclear medicine tests decreased.

DOI10.1016/j.jacr.2019.08.013
Alternate JournalJ Am Coll Radiol
PubMed ID31918865
Division: 
Health Policy & Economics
Category: 
Faculty Publication