For information about COVID-19, including symptoms and prevention, please read our COVID-19 patient guide. Please also consider supporting Weill Cornell Medicine’s efforts against the pandemic.

Physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the Middle East and North Africa: An overview of systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

TitlePhysical activity and sedentary behaviour in the Middle East and North Africa: An overview of systematic reviews and meta-analysis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsChaabane S, Chaabna K, Abraham A, Mamtani R, Cheema S
JournalSci Rep
Volume10
Issue1
Pagination9363
Date Published2020 Jun 09
ISSN2045-2322
Abstract

To support the global strategy to reduce risk factors for obesity, we synthesized the evidence on physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Our systematic overview included seven systematic reviews reporting 229 primary studies. The meta-analysis included 125 prevalence measures from 20 MENA countries. After 2000, 50.8% of adults (ranging from 13.2% in Sudan to 94.9% in Jordan) and 25.6% of youth (ranging from 8.3% in Egypt to 51.0% in Lebanon) were sufficiently active. Limited data on PA behaviours is available for MENA countries, with the exception of Gulf Cooperation Council countries. The meta-regression identified gender and geographical coverage among youth, and the PA measurement as predictors of PA prevalence for both adults and youth. Our analysis suggests a significant PA prevalence increase among adults over the last two decades. The inconsistency in sedentary behaviour measurement is related to the absence of standardized guidelines for its quantification and interpretation. The global epidemic of insufficient PA is prevalent in MENA. Lower PA participation among youth and specifically females should be addressed by focused lifestyle interventions. The recognition of sedentary behaviour as a public health issue in the region remains unclear. Additional data on PA behaviours is needed from low- and middle-income countries in the region.

DOI10.1038/s41598-020-66163-x
Alternate JournalSci Rep
PubMed ID32518254
PubMed Central IDPMC7283267
Category: 
Faculty Publication