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Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

TitleSmall primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsCasalino LP, Pesko MF, Ryan AM, Mendelsohn JL, Copeland KR, Ramsay PPamela, Sun X, Rittenhouse DR, Shortell SM
JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
Volume33
Issue9
Pagination1680-8
Date Published2014 Sep
ISSN1544-5208
KeywordsAged, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Male, Medicare, Physicians' Offices, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Primary Health Care, Quality Improvement, Quality of Health Care, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Abstract

Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care.

DOI10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0434
Alternate JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
PubMed ID25122562
Category: 
Faculty Publication