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States With Prescription Drug Monitoring Mandates Saw A Reduction In Opioids Prescribed To Medicaid Enrollees.

TitleStates With Prescription Drug Monitoring Mandates Saw A Reduction In Opioids Prescribed To Medicaid Enrollees.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsWen H, Schackman BR, Aden B, Bao Y
JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
Volume36
Issue4
Pagination733-741
Date Published2017 04 01
ISSN1544-5208
KeywordsAnalgesics, Opioid, Controlled Substances, Drug Monitoring, Drug Utilization, Humans, Medicaid, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Prescription Drugs, United States
Abstract

Prescription drug monitoring programs are promising tools to use in addressing the prescription opioid epidemic, yet prescribers' participation in these state-run programs remained low as of 2014. Statutory mandates for prescribers to register with their state's program, use it, or both are believed to be effective tools to realize the programs' full potential. Our analysis of aggregate Medicaid drug utilization data indicates that state mandates for prescriber registration or use adopted in 2011-14 were associated with a reduction of 9-10 percent in population-adjusted numbers of Schedule II opioid prescriptions received by Medicaid enrollees and amounts of Medicaid spending on these prescriptions. This effect was largely associated with mandates of registration, which were comprehensive in all adopting states, and not with mandates of use, which were largely limited in scope or strength before 2015. Our findings support the use of mandates of registration in prescription drug monitoring programs as an effective and relatively low-cost policy. Future research should further assess the value of strong mandates of use to ensure safer and more appropriate prescribing of opioids.

DOI10.1377/hlthaff.2016.1141
Alternate JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
PubMed ID28373340
PubMed Central IDPMC5625882
Grant ListP30 DA040500 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
Category: 
Faculty Publication